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Get Organized With Wall Mount Tool Organizers From WORX

WORX 18 in. Wall Mount Tool Organizer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (PRWEB) January 21, 2020
Pressed for space, consider the new WORX® wall mount tool organizers for the garage or home shop. These handy organizers help keep frequently used tools and accessories together in the same location, eliminating time-consuming, search-and-find missions.
The WORX Wall Mount Tool Holder, WA0138, includes two wall hooks and measures 6.7 in.W x 2.2 in.H x 3.5 in.D and accommodates WORX string trimmers, blowers/vacs, chainsaws, JawSaw, hedge trimmers, and more.The Wall Mount Tool Holder is constructed of composite nylon for strength and durability. Four wood screws are included for installation. When mounted to studs, the tool holder’s weight capacity is 33 lbs. When installed into drywall with anchors, it supports loads up to 17 lbs.
Take it a step further with the WORX 18 in. Wall Mount Tool Holder, WA0139. This expanded organizer includes two WA0138 tool holders and incorporates an 18 in.W x 2.5 in.H aluminum track to save space and create a versatile wall system. Secure the track to the wall with the four included wood screws and slide the wall mount tool holders into place. It is ideally suited to store up to three hand-held lawn and garden power tools, such as a string trimmer, blower, chainsaw or hedge trimmer and other tools.
Homeowners can mount multiple tool holders to store most of their powered lawn and garden tools. Due to the weight factor, the 18 in. Wall Mount Tool Holder should be installed into studs.
It’s recommended to clean all cutting tools prior to storage. Also, when cordless power tools are stored in the garage or shed, it’s a good practice to remove the batteries and store them indoors. Hot and cold temperature extremes can impact battery performance.
The WORX Wall Mount Tool Holder, (WA0138, $9.99) and the W ORX 18” Wall Mount Tool Holder (WA0139, $29.99) are available at worx.com.
Reach out to WORX social media links, including Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worxus?ref=hl; Twitter: https://twitter.com/WORXTools; Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/worxtools and Instagram: @WORXTools

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Mount Sinai Research Finds that Heterogeneity of Liver Cancer Cells Help Explain Tumor Progression in Patients

NEW YORK (PRWEB) January 16, 2020
Many liver cancer tumors contain a highly diverse set of cells, a phenomenon known as intra-tumor heterogeneity that can significantly affect the rate at which the cancer grows, Mount Sinai researchers report. The immune system’s contribution to this heterogeneity can have major clinical implications.
In a study published in January in Nature Communications, the team reported that this heterogeneity—either within the same tumor or between different tumor regions in the same tumor nodule—appears in about 30 percent of patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer, and that some of these tumors grow rapidly by hijacking different gene networks.
“Tumors are a complex ecosystem, and we’re developing for the first time a blueprint of the different ways they can evolve in patients with liver cancer by interacting with the immune system,” says Augusto Villanueva, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Liver Cancer Program at The Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai, and corresponding author of the study. “By better understanding how tumors progress, we’re learning more about how they adapt to pharmacological pressures, and how they can develop mechanisms of resistance to cancer therapies. This greater awareness will hopefully lead to the identification of biomarkers that can predict which patients will be responsive to treatment.”
Among the clinical implications associated with intra-tumor heterogeneity identified by the research team was the discovery that a single liver cancer biopsy could potentially mischaracterize a liver tumor.
“Some tumors are very homogeneous in terms of their genetic makeup and immune cell infiltration, while others are very heterogeneous,” says Dr. Villanueva. “This means that a biopsy from the same tumor could yield different information depending on where it was taken, and could thus affect clinical decision-making for the patient. That’s why our work aimed at learning how tumors evolve and the different trajectories they can take is so important to future cancer research, as well as to effectively treating the disease.”
As immunotherapy continues to transform cancer research and treatment, one of the most promising areas is liver cancer, which has become the fastest-rising malignancy in the United States in terms of incidence and mortality, responsible for 33,000 new cases annually. Two phase 2 clinical trials using PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which help the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancerous cells, have achieved unprecedented responses in humans, prompting the Food and Drug Administration to grant them accelerated approval status for second-line treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer.
More recently, a phase 3 clinical trial combining a PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor with an antiangiogenic improved survival compared to the current first-line standard of care, sorafenib. Still, only about 30 percent of patients with HCC are believed to respond favorably to immune checkpoint inhibition—an outcome not uncommon with immunotherapies.
“The immune system imposes significant constraints on liver cancer evolution, and by investigating the interaction of immune cells and cancer cells at the molecular level we’re trying to predict or anticipate mechanisms of tumor resistance,” explains Bojan Losic, PhD, Associate Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Cancer Immunology Program, at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and lead author of the study. “Our work is particularly relevant considering the remarkable success of immune checkpoint inhibitors in some heterogeneous solid tumors.”
To understand the mechanisms that drive tumor progression on a patient-by-patient basis, the research team from Mount Sinai and other medical centers around the world performed an integrated molecular analysis of gene expression, immune activities, and DNA mutations from multiple regions of the same tumor nodule in 14 liver cancer patients. The study was the first to use single-cell RNA sequencing in multiple regions of the same tumor nodule, and was among the first to assess the contribution of the immune system to liver cancer evolution.
The Mount Sinai-led study consisted of researchers from the University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine in Brazil; the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany; Lausanne University Hospital CHUV in Switzerland; Universitat de Barcelona in Spain; Clinica Universidad de Navarra in Spain; Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia; and IBM Research.
About the Mount Sinai Health SystemThe Mount Sinai Health System is New York City’s largest integrated delivery system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai’s vision is to produce the safest care, the highest quality, the highest satisfaction, the best access and the best value of any health system in the nation. The Health System includes approximately 7,480 primary and specialty care physicians; 11 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 410 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. The Icahn School of Medicine is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Medical Schools”, aligned with a U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” Hospital, No. 12 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding, and among the top 10 most innovative research institutions as ranked by the journal Nature in its Nature Innovation Index. This reflects a special level of excellence in education, clinical practice, and research. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked No. 14 on U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” of top U.S. hospitals; it is one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Orthopedics in the 2019-2020 “Best Hospitals” issue. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked nationally in five out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 12th nationally for Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West are ranked 23rd nationally for Nephrology and 25th for Diabetes/Endocrinology, and Mount Sinai South Nassau is ranked 35th nationally for Urology. Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai West, and Mount Sinai South Nassau are ranked regionally.
For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

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In a Mount Sinai Study, Elevated Leukemia Incidence Is Found in World Trade Center Rescue and Recovery Workers

NEW YORK (PRWEB) January 15, 2020
Responders who worked at the World Trade Center site after the attacks on September 11, 2001, have an increased overall cancer incidence compared to the general population, particularly in thyroid cancer, prostate cancer, and, for the first time ever reported, leukemia, according to a Mount Sinai study published in JNCI Cancer Spectrum in January.
Following the attacks on the World Trade Center, 50,000 workers were involved in rescue and recovery, with many of them caught directly in the dust cloud from the collapsing towers. From then until cleanup of the site ended in June 2002, workers were potentially exposed to an array of toxins later shown to cause adverse health effects, including cancer.
This study examined cancer incidence in responders including law enforcement, construction, and telecommunications workers, and found an increased overall cancer incidence, with the greatest elevation in thyroid cancer. It is the first to show an increase in leukemia, which is known to occur after exposure to occupational carcinogens, including benzene fuel and other sources that existed at the World Trade Center site, in some cases at low levels of exposure and with a latency of several years from exposure.
Researchers also found that neither the length of time that first responders and recovery workers worked on the World Trade Center site, nor the intensity of their exposure, had any bearing on the development of the elevated cancers. However, some risk factors—such as responders’ age on September 11, their gender, and whether they were smokers at the time—were associated with increased cancer risk, underlining the need for continued surveillance of World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers.
“This study showed increased incidence of several cancer types compared to previously conducted studies with shorter follow-up periods,” said Susan Teitelbaum, PhD, Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and one of the lead authors. “Because of the long latency period of many types of cancer, it is possible that increased rates of other cancers, as well as World Trade Center exposure health issues, may emerge after longer periods of study.”
Researchers studied post-September 11 cancer incidence among 28,729 rescue and recovery workers via cancer registry data from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Florida, and North Carolina from 2002 through 2013. Although the incidence of certain cancers, such as lung, was not elevated in this study’s findings, researchers believe that may be due to the long time periods over which these cancers develop.
This work was supported by contract 200-2017-93325 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health.
About the Mount Sinai Health SystemThe Mount Sinai Health System is New York City’s largest integrated delivery system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai’s vision is to produce the safest care, the highest quality, the highest satisfaction, the best access and the best value of any health system in the nation. The Health System includes approximately 7,480 primary and specialty care physicians; 11 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 410 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. The Icahn School of Medicine is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Medical Schools”, aligned with a U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” Hospital, No. 12 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding, and among the top 10 most innovative research institutions as ranked by the journal Nature in its Nature Innovation Index. This reflects a special level of excellence in education, clinical practice, and research. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked No. 14 on U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” of top U.S. hospitals; it is one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Orthopedics in the 2019-2020 “Best Hospitals” issue. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked nationally in five out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 12th nationally for Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai St. Lukes and Mount Sinai West are ranked 23rd nationally for Nephrology and 25th for Diabetes/Endocrinology, and Mount Sinai South Nassau is ranked 35th nationally for Urology. Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai West, and Mount Sinai South Nassau are ranked regionally.
For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

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January Is Thyroid Awareness Month: Mount Sinai Doctors Offer Unique Procedures for Thyroid Nodules and Stress Importance of Early Detection

NEW YORK (PRWEB) January 10, 2020
January is Thyroid Awareness Month, and physicians from the Hilda and J. Lester Gabrilove Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease and the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the Mount Sinai Health System are emphasizing the importance of being aware of symptoms that may be related to thyroid disease.
The thyroid gland is located in the front of the neck and under the voice box. It produces hormones that help the body control the rate of metabolism, and regulate the production and consumption of energy. When thyroid function is accelerated, the condition is called hyperthyroidism; when slowed, it is called hypothyroidism. Imbalances in thyroid function may be a result of environmental, autoimmune, or genetic factors. Additionally, thyroid issues may lead to cancer.
Thyroid disease affects roughly 200 million people worldwide, and thyroid cancer is on the rise, with roughly 52,000 new cases diagnosed in 2019, according to the American Cancer Society. Three out of four thyroid cancer diagnoses are made in women. Data from the American Thyroid Association shows that more than 12 percent of the U.S. population will develop a thyroid condition in their lifetime, and the cause of these problems is largely unknown. An estimated 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease and up to 60 percent of them don’t know they have it, so they go undiagnosed and untreated. “Women are five to eight times more likely than men to have thyroid issues, and one in eight women will develop a thyroid disorder. People with a family history of thyroid disease and/or thyroid cancer, and exposure to high doses of radiation, are also at increased risk,” said Terry Davies, MD, Co-Director of the Mount Sinai Thyroid Center at Union Square and Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
How to Perform a Thyroid Neck Self-Exam:
Use a mirror and focus on the lower middle area of your neck, above the collarbones and below the Adam’s apple (larynx). Your thyroid gland is located in this area of your neck.
While focusing on this area in the mirror, tip your head back.
Take a drink of water and swallow.
As you swallow, look at your neck. Check for any bulges or protrusions in this area when you swallow. Reminder: Don’t confuse the Adam’s apple with the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located further down on your neck, closer to the collarbone. You may want to repeat this process several times.
If you do see any bulges or protrusions in this area, see your physician. You may have an enlarged thyroid gland or a thyroid nodule and should be checked to determine whether cancer is present or if treatment for thyroid disease is needed.
Symptoms and Facts about Thyroid Disease

Hyperthyroidism is an overactive thyroid and hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid.
Symptoms of hyperthyroidism are rapid weight loss, high blood pressure, anxiety, and insomnia.
Symptoms of hypothyroidism are weak or slow heartbeat; muscular weakness; constant fatigue; weight gain; depression; slow reflexes; sensitivity to cold; thick, puffy, or dry skin; slowed mental processes and poor memory; and constipation.
Goiter is another thyroid condition; it involves a visibly enlarged thyroid gland, often causing difficulty swallowing or breathing.
Thyroid cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women.
The number of new cases of thyroid cancer is growing most rapidly among all cancers in both men and women, due to increased detection.
Thyroid Disease and PregnancyPregnant women should be aware of changes to their thyroid gland, which can be affected by different levels of pregnancy hormones. The thyroid hormone greatly contributes to the development of a healthy baby, and it is important that expectant mothers be properly diagnosed with and treated for thyroid disease. Otherwise, they could be at higher risk of miscarriage or preterm delivery, and their children may have developmental delays. For that reason, thyroid function is routinely checked in pregnant women.
When it comes to thyroid cancer, a large number of women develop this during their reproductive age. Since thyroid cancer tends to be mediated by hormones in the body, it tends to grow faster when patients are pregnant. There is no special cancer screening recommendation for pregnant women.
Mount Sinai Is a Leader in Noninvasive Thyroid Treatment
Radiofrequency Ablation for Thyroid NodulesMount Sinai West is one of only two hospitals in New York State offering a minimally invasive procedure to treat non-cancerous thyroid nodules that are symptomatic and would have otherwise required invasive surgery for removal. The procedure is called radio-frequency ablation (RFA). It offers eligible patients a much quicker recovery, less pain and risk of infection, and no scarring. With RFA, surgeons use guided ultrasound to deliver radio-frequency current to heat up and shrink the thyroid nodule. RFA can be done on patients with large non-cancerous nodules that cause swallowing, voice, breathing, and neck discomfort.
Patients who undergo RFA can return to normal activity the day after the procedure and can exercise within several days. Additionally, they are extremely unlikely to require permanent thyroid hormone medication. Patients who have standard thyroid nodule surgery typically can’t resume normal activity for at least a month and 20 to 30 percent of these patients require thyroid medication.
“Radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodules has been performed in Korea for over a decade and throughout Europe and their outcomes are excellent. The published data shows impressive nodule shrinkage rates of more than 80 percent with RFA that is maintained over years of follow-up,” explained Catherine Sinclair, MD, Associate Professor of Otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Director of Head and Neck Surgery at Mount Sinai West. “Thyroid nodules are very common and, although many people will never require any intervention for their nodules, there is a significant minority who will seek treatment due to symptoms. I expect RFA to be a terrific new option for these patients.”
Ethanol Ablation for Thyroid NodulesAnother noninvasive procedure, performed at Mount Sinai-Union Square, ethanol ablation is when an alcohol solution is injected into thyroid nodules, killing cells and causing the masses to slowly shrink. The procedure leaves only a small scar and is performed in office with local anesthesia.
“The candidates for RFA and ethanol ablation are very similar,” says Maria Brito, MD, Co-Director of the Mount Sinai Thyroid Center at Union Square. Dr. Brito and Michael Via, MD, both Associate Professors of Medicine (Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, are two of only a handful of physicians in the New York metropolitan region to perform ethanol ablation.
“The procedures will not necessarily eliminate the nodule completely, and patients will still need to have ultrasound follow-ups to monitor the nodule,” Dr. Brito says. “But in appropriate cases, they are a terrific option. They make it very easy for the patient.”
About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is New York City’s largest integrated delivery system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai’s vision is to produce the safest care, the highest quality, the highest satisfaction, the best access and the best value of any health system in the nation. The Health System includes approximately 7,480 primary and specialty care physicians; 11 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 410 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. The Icahn School of Medicine is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Medical Schools”, aligned with a U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” Hospital, No. 12 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding, and among the top 10 most innovative research institutions as ranked by the journal Nature in its Nature Innovation Index. This reflects a special level of excellence in education, clinical practice, and research. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked No. 14 on U.S. News & World Report’s “Honor Roll” of top U.S. hospitals; it is one of the nation’s top 20 hospitals in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Nephrology, Neurology/Neurosurgery, and Orthopedics in the 2019-2020 “Best Hospitals” issue. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked nationally in five out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 12th nationally for Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West are ranked 23rd nationally for Nephrology and 25th for Diabetes/Endocrinology, and Mount Sinai South Nassau is ranked 35th nationally for Urology. Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, Mount Sinai West, and Mount Sinai South Nassau are ranked regionally.
For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Larson Electronics Releases 50W LED Work Light With Tripod Mount, 3.5' to 10', 5,500 Lumens

Press Release – updated: Jan 9, 2020 17:00 CST

KEMP, Texas, January 9, 2020 (Newswire.com) – Larson Electronics, a Texas-based company with over 40 years of experience spearheading the industrial lighting and equipment sectors, announced the release of a 50-watt, dual-LED work light with tripod mount that produces a total of 5,500 lumens of light output. This tripod mounted LED light comes with a 12V DC jump pack for mobile power and features a 16-foot coil cord with a cigarette plug.
The WAL-TP.S-2X25WRE-RPS.500W 50-watt dual tripod mounted LED work light features two Larson Electronics LED25WRE-CPR LED spotlights each producing 2,7500 lumens of light. This unit draws on less than 2.25 amps from a 12V electrical system. The LEDs are combined with a high output reflector to produce a narrow 10˚ spot beam of 1,000 feet long, combined with a 60˚ flood beam.
Larson Electronics’ LED work light is an ultra-compact combination spot and floodlight with a 4.5” OD lamp head. The LEDs are waterproof up to 3 meters and sealed against dust and dirt. The LEDs provide 50,000 hours of lamp life with an average 70% lumen retention. This unit can withstand rapid temperature changes of -40˚C to 85˚C and feature housings made from extruded aluminum with polycarbonate lenses.
This LED work light with a tripod mount can operate on current ranging from 12V to 32V DC without modifications. This light comes with 16 feet of coil cord with a cigarette plug allowing for easy portability. A 12V jump pack provides mobile power for up to 15 hours per full charge. This unit comes with an adjustable aluminum tripod that can reach 10 feet in height and be lowered to 3.5 feet. Suitable applications include construction sites, manufacturing facilities, parking lot lighting, and more.
About Larson Electronics LLC: Larson Electronics LLC is a manufacturer of industrial lighting equipment and accessories. The company offers an extensive catalog of industry-grade lighting and power distribution products for the following sectors: manufacturing, construction, food processing, oil and gas, military, marine and automobile. Customers can benefit from the company’s hands-on, customized approach to lighting solutions. Larson Electronics provides expedited service for quotes, customer support and shipments.
Source: Larson Electronics

Mount Pleasant Alzheimer's Special Care Center Offers a Chance to Experience What It's Like Living With Dementia

Mount Pleasant Gardens Offers Caregivers a Chance to Experience What It’s Like Living with Dementia
Press Release – updated: Jan 6, 2020 16:12 EST

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C., January 6, 2020 (Newswire.com) – Mount Pleasant Gardens, a leader in providing quality care and housing services to people living with memory loss, is hosting a special event designed to help caregivers experience the challenges of living with dementia. Dementia Live is an innovative program designed by a team of dementia experts from AGE-u-cate Training Institute. This special event will be held at 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020 at the community located at 1025 Hungryneck Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464.
Dementia Live uses special gear to help simulate the cognitive impairments and sensory changes that are part of living with dementia. Participants will gain a sense of the obstacles and difficulties those living with dementia face daily.
“The goal of this program is to give caregivers a greater sense of understanding and empathy for what their loved ones face every day,” says Leanne Lovin, Community Resource Director. “By having a greater understanding, we hope to foster a greater sense of compassion, helping caregivers to provide better support for the ones they love.”
If you are interested in attending this special event, please call Mount Pleasant Gardens 843-216-1001. To learn more about Dementia Live or our memory care, please visit https://www.jeaseniorliving.com/senior-living/sc/mount-pleasant/mt-pleasant-gardens/contact-us.
Source: Mount Pleasant Gardens Alzheimer’s Special Care Center