memory

Governor's Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living Community Welcomes Kendra Pittman Smith

Press Release – updated: Nov 27, 2019 09:00 EST

ATLANTA, November 27, 2019 (Newswire.com) – Governor’s Glen is pleased to announce and welcome Kendra Pittman Smith to their family. 
Governor’s Glen is a vibrant, active memory care and assisted living community that prides themselves on their dedication to treating residents like family. The community is quite unique in that it has custom built neighborhoods that are designed to have a local, home-like feel. They truly provide an environment that makes each resident and their family members feel at ease about assisted living. 
This community is more than a place for your loved one to live. They strive to create a vibrant, active community, treating each resident in body, mind and soul. Their residents love the activities that are offered regularly; the most popular being, pet therapy, music therapy, and sensory stimulation.
Governor’s Glen is conveniently located and easily accessible to those living in Stockbridge, Forest Park, McDonough, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Hampton and other areas in and around Atlanta.
Kendra, a native of Atlanta Georgia, has over 20 years of outstanding experience as a senior advocate. She has always had a passion to help others, graduating from Georgia State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a minor in Sociology. 
In addition to her passion for senior wellness, Kendra is also the owner of a non-profit, Heartfelt Connections Inc., which services the needs of individuals with children who have been diagnosed with Autism, ADHD, OCD, and other exceptionalities. Kendra is also a Certified Life Coach, and licensed insurance agent for the state of Georgia. 
Kendra’s love for serving the community and passion for seniors and their wellness make her a wonderful addition to the Governor’s Glen family. Both the Governor’s team and residents are thrilled that she is coming on board and cannot wait to see where this next step takes their community.
Source: Governor’s Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living

Governor's Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living Community Welcomes Kendra Pittman Smith

Press Release – updated: Nov 27, 2019 09:00 EST

ATLANTA, November 27, 2019 (Newswire.com) – Governor’s Glen is pleased to announce and welcome Kendra Pittman Smith to their family. 
Governor’s Glen is a vibrant, active memory care and assisted living community that prides themselves on their dedication to treating residents like family. The community is quite unique in that it has custom built neighborhoods that are designed to have a local, home-like feel. They truly provide an environment that makes each resident and their family members feel at ease about assisted living. 
This community is more than a place for your loved one to live. They strive to create a vibrant, active community, treating each resident in body, mind and soul. Their residents love the activities that are offered regularly; the most popular being, pet therapy, music therapy, and sensory stimulation.
Governor’s Glen is conveniently located and easily accessible to those living in Stockbridge, Forest Park, McDonough, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Hampton and other areas in and around Atlanta.
Kendra, a native of Atlanta Georgia, has over 20 years of outstanding experience as a senior advocate. She has always had a passion to help others, graduating from Georgia State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a minor in Sociology. 
In addition to her passion for senior wellness, Kendra is also the owner of a non-profit, Heartfelt Connections Inc., which services the needs of individuals with children who have been diagnosed with Autism, ADHD, OCD, and other exceptionalities. Kendra is also a Certified Life Coach, and licensed insurance agent for the state of Georgia. 
Kendra’s love for serving the community and passion for seniors and their wellness make her a wonderful addition to the Governor’s Glen family. Both the Governor’s team and residents are thrilled that she is coming on board and cannot wait to see where this next step takes their community.
Source: Governor’s Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living

Governor's Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living Community Welcomes Kendra Pittman Smith

Press Release – updated: Nov 27, 2019 09:00 EST

ATLANTA, November 27, 2019 (Newswire.com) – Governor’s Glen is pleased to announce and welcome Kendra Pittman Smith to their family. 
Governor’s Glen is a vibrant, active memory care and assisted living community that prides themselves on their dedication to treating residents like family. The community is quite unique in that it has custom built neighborhoods that are designed to have a local, home-like feel. They truly provide an environment that makes each resident and their family members feel at ease about assisted living. 
This community is more than a place for your loved one to live. They strive to create a vibrant, active community, treating each resident in body, mind and soul. Their residents love the activities that are offered regularly; the most popular being, pet therapy, music therapy, and sensory stimulation.
Governor’s Glen is conveniently located and easily accessible to those living in Stockbridge, Forest Park, McDonough, Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Hampton and other areas in and around Atlanta.
Kendra, a native of Atlanta Georgia, has over 20 years of outstanding experience as a senior advocate. She has always had a passion to help others, graduating from Georgia State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a minor in Sociology. 
In addition to her passion for senior wellness, Kendra is also the owner of a non-profit, Heartfelt Connections Inc., which services the needs of individuals with children who have been diagnosed with Autism, ADHD, OCD, and other exceptionalities. Kendra is also a Certified Life Coach, and licensed insurance agent for the state of Georgia. 
Kendra’s love for serving the community and passion for seniors and their wellness make her a wonderful addition to the Governor’s Glen family. Both the Governor’s team and residents are thrilled that she is coming on board and cannot wait to see where this next step takes their community.
Source: Governor’s Glen Memory Care & Assisted Living

Brooklyn Pointe Assisted Living and Memory Care to Host a Jolly Jamboree Featuring Santa on December 14th, 2019

Brooklyn Pointe Assisted Living & Memory Care

This is a great opportunity for children, families, and our residents to come together, learn from each other, and celebrate all the festivities we’ll have at the Jamboree.

BROOKLYN, Ohio (PRWEB) November 25, 2019
To celebrate the holidays, Brooklyn Pointe Assisted Living and Memory Care, a newly constructed community, is hosting a family-friendly event: Jolly Jamboree at 4800 Idlewood Drive in Brooklyn, OH on December 14th, 2019 from 2:00 to 3:30pm. Managed by Meridian Senior Living, Brooklyn Pointe is the city of Brooklyn’s first assisted living residence and offers a total of 80 apartments including a variety of studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom apartment styles.
“We want the holidays to inspire and encourage interaction and appreciation across multiple generations,” expresses Pamela Haney, Executive Director of Brooklyn Pointe. “This is a great opportunity for children, families, and our residents to come together, learn from each other, and celebrate all the festivities we’ll have at the Jamboree.”
“Not only do we hope the holiday activities are magical and fun, but also support life engagement and family connections, two of the five directional paths in our exclusive memory care program,” states Sue Johnston, VP Program Development of Meridian Senior Living.”
A fun time will be had by all ages and generations with holiday themed activities including decorating gingerbread man treats, singing Christmas carols, enjoying light refreshments, and, the highlight of the event, visiting with Santa. Attendees of this event will have the opportunity to mingle with residents and their families while taking in the festivities and spectacles of the new state-of-the–art building amongst a backdrop of holiday theming. Families are free to bring their cameras or smartphones to snap photos of their children’s special moments with Santa as an onsite photographer will not be present.
This sensational, free event is open to the public. For more information about the Jolly Jamboree or Brooklyn Pointe, call (216) 772–0217 or visit http://www.brooklyn-pointe.com.
About Meridian Senior Living:Meridian Senior Living, a privately held company based in Bethesda, Maryland, owns and operates seniors housing communities across the country and provides operational consulting to 24 communities in China. With more than 70 communities in 21 states and more in development, Meridian is one of the largest seniors housing operators in the U.S. The company prides itself on providing the highest quality care, exceptional lifestyle programming and a distinctive dining experience for its residents. For more information on Meridian Senior Living, visit meridiansenior.com.

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Memory Expert Ron White Shares 11 Natural Cures to Brain Fog on His YouTube Channel

Memory Champion Reveals His Personal Secrets to Cure Brain Fog and Develop a Quick, Sharp and Healthy Brain at Any Age
Press Release – updated: Nov 21, 2019 08:00 EST

FORT WORTH, Texas, November 21, 2019 (Newswire.com) – Memory expert Ron White and founder of Brain Athlete, Inc. has released his personal list of top 11 natural remedies to brain fog. Brain fog is something that can cripple anyone from a child to a senior. It’s a feeling of a cloudy head, helplessness and an inability to focus. When someone’s job or performance depends on focusing, this can be a productivity killer.
On his YouTube channel, Ron reveals how he personally beats this mental monster with some simple tips including drinking plenty of water, looking for things in his diet, such as dairy, that may be causing brain fog or adding supplements to his diet such as a B12 supplement.
​In this enlightening video, Ron White walks viewers through 11 very simple natural cures anyone can implement to tackle their brain fog once and for all. 
In demonstrations of extreme mental clarity, Ron has memorized the names of 300 people he met at a conference and then repeated their names rapid-fire from memory. He’s memorized the United States Constitution word for word (4,500 words) and written it out on a wall from memory.
At memory tournaments, he’s memorized as many as 155 names in 15 minutes or a deck of cards in only 1 minute and 27 seconds.
In these demonstrations of extreme focusing, he showed that anyone can beat brain fog and achieve tremendous results with their memory. The steps he reveals are simple to implement. To watch the video, check it out here http://brainathlete.info/.
Media Contact:​Ron White​Email: ron@ronwhitetaining.com​Instagram: @brainathlete 
Source: Ron White

Predicting Alzheimer's Disease-Like Memory Loss Before It Strikes

New study shows how patterns in brain activity can be an early predictor of Alzheimer’s symptoms
SAN FRANCISCO, November 19, 2019 (Newswire.com) – For a person with Alzheimer’s disease, there’s no turning back the clock. By the time she begins to experience memory loss and other worrisome signs, cognitive decline has already set in. And decades of clinical trials have failed to produce treatments that could help her regain her memory. Today, researchers at Gladstone Institutes are approaching this devastating disease from a different angle.
In a new study published in Cell Reports, they demonstrate that particular patterns of brain activity can predict far in advance whether a young mouse will develop Alzheimer’s-like memory deficits in old age.
“Being able to predict deficits long before they appear could open up new opportunities to design and test interventions that prevent Alzheimer’s in people,” said Gladstone Senior Investigator Yadong Huang, senior author of the study.
The new work builds on a 2016 study of mice engineered to carry the gene for apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4). Carrying the ApoE4 gene is associated with an increased risk — but not a guarantee — of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. As they age, ApoE4 mice often, but not always, develop signs of memory loss similar to those seen in people with Alzheimer’s.
In the previous study, Huang and his team investigated a type of brain activity called sharp-wave ripples (SWRs), which play a direct role in spatial learning and memory formation in mammals. SWRs occur when the brain of a resting mouse or human rapidly and repeatedly replays a recent memory of moving through a space, such as a maze or a house.
“SWRs have two important measurable components: abundance and short gamma (SG) power,” said Emily Jones, Ph.D., lead author of the new study and recent graduate of UC San Francisco’s (UCSF) Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program. “Broadly, SWR abundance predicts how quickly an ApoE4 mouse can learn and memorize how to get through a maze, and SG power predicts how accurate that memory will be.”
The earlier study revealed that aging ApoE4 mice have lower SWR abundance and weaker SG power than seen in healthy aging mice. Based on those results, Jones and her colleagues hypothesized that measuring SWR activity could predict the severity of demonstrable memory problems in ApoE4 mice during aging.
To test this idea, the researchers first recorded SWR activity in aging ApoE4 mice at rest. One month later, they had the mice perform spatial tasks to test their memory. They found that mice with fewer SWRs and lower SG power were indeed more likely to have worse spatial memory deficits.
“We actually successfully replicated this experiment two years later with different mice,” said Huang, who is also a professor of neurology and pathology at UCSF. “What was striking is that we were able to use the results from the first cohort to predict with high accuracy the extent of learning and memory deficits in the second cohort, based on their SWR activity.”
Even more striking were the unexpected results of the team’s next experiment.
The researchers were curious how SWR activity evolves over a mouse’s lifetime, which no one had previously investigated. So, they periodically measured SWRs in ApoE4 mice from an early age — long before memory deficits appeared — through middle age and into old age.
“We thought that, if we got lucky, the SWR measurements we took when the mice were middle-aged might have some predictive relationship to later memory problems,” Jones said.
Surprisingly, the analysis revealed that deficits in SWR abundance and SG power at an early age predicted which mice performed worse on memory tasks 10 months later — the equivalent of 30 years for a human.
“We were not betting on these results, the idea that young mice with no memory problems already have the seed of what’s going to lead to deficits in old age,” Jones said. “Although we would love to, but we thought it would be ridiculous to be able to predict so far in advance.”
Since SWRs are also found in humans, these findings suggest that SWR abundance and SG power could potentially serve as early predictors of Alzheimer’s disease, long before memory problems arise.
As a next step toward evaluating that possibility, Huang will work with colleagues at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center to determine whether SWRs in Alzheimer’s patients show deficits in abundance and SG power similar to those seen in mouse models of the disease.
“A major advantage of this approach is that researchers have recently developed a noninvasive technique for measuring SWRs in people, without implanting electrodes in the brain,” Huang said.
If SWRs are indeed predictive of Alzheimer’s in humans, measuring them could boost research and drug development efforts in two important ways. First, they could be used to select participants for clinical trials, testing new drugs to stave off Alzheimer’s. Enrolling patients who already show SWR deficits would enhance the trials’ statistical power. Second, SWR measurements could be taken repeatedly and noninvasively, enabling researchers to test drug effects over time, even before memory deficits appear.
Huang emphasizes the value of SWRs as a functional predictor, one that directly measures the decline in brain function seen in Alzheimer’s, as opposed to a pathological change that only appears as a result of the underlying disease.
“I feel strongly that Alzheimer’s research should not just focus on pathology but use functional alterations like SWR deficits to guide research and drug development,” he said. “Our new findings support this kind of approach.”
The new study is just one facet of Gladstone’s extensive Alzheimer’s research program. “Gladstone provides a unique setting that makes it possible to do the kind of translational research necessary to improve understanding and treatment of this disease,” Huang said.
About the Research Project
Other authors include Anna Gillespie, Ph.D., from UCSF; Seo Yeon Yoon from Gladstone; and Loren Frank, Ph.D., from UC San Francisco and the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes.
The work was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (grant 1144247), a National Institute on Aging Predoctoral Fellowship (grant F31AG057150), a Genentech Foundation Fellowship, a Simons Collaboration for the Global Brain Fellowship, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and the National Institute on Aging (grants RF1AG047655, RF1AG055421, and R01AG055682).
About the Gladstone Institutes
To ensure our work does the greatest good, the Gladstone Institutes focuses on conditions with profound medical, economic, and social impact — unsolved diseases. Gladstone is an independent, nonprofit life science research organization that uses visionary science and technology to overcome disease. It has an academic affiliation with the University of California, San Francisco.
Media Contact:Megan McDevitt  megan.mcdevitt@gladstone.org415.734.2019
Source: Gladstone Institutes